Liberating women through body art

Liberating women through body paint
English 10/03/2019 15:55 Mexico City Actualizada 16:03

Mega Body Paint Mexico organized an event to celebrate its 5th anniversary and women through art

These year, the theme was women's rights - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

Frida Khalo was a favorite among artists - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

The artist researched the story behind International Women's Day for this design - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

Women used their bodies as a canvas to demand freedom and no more violence against them - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

Artists started working since 9 a.m. - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

Motives included flowers, butterflies, and women - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

For many women, this is a liberating experience - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

Men were also part of the celebration - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

"Every man is the reflection of a woman" - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

The event celebrated Body Paint Mexico's 5th anniversary - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

Mexico City's Culture Minister was present at the event - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

Women's rights, such as abortion, where a common theme this year - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

Mega Body Paint Mexico also organizes an event to celebrate the Day of the Dead

Liberating women through body paint

These events are an outlet for creativity - Photo: Gretel Morales/EL UNIVERSAL in English

Liberating women through body paint

Mega Body Paint México is celebrating its 5th anniversary with a body painting event in Mexico City!

Mega Body Paint México is formed by artists, models, photographers, and led by Jessica Esquivias. They organize an event to Celebrate the Day of Dead every year, where the public can have their face painted by professional makeup artists to celebrate the ancient tradition. 

With an unquestionable entrepreneurial aura, Jessica Esquivias, president of Mega Body Paint México, says that “body art or body paint is a technique that demands the use of living canvases” emphasizing the respect from the makeup artist towards the canvases, the process and, above all, the models.

Jessica shares how Mega Body Paint México started on May 8, 2014, in the celebration of the International Women's Day. “The event took place at the Doctores quarter in the Cuauhtémoc borough, it gathered 96 models and 73 make up artists,” with a focus on the value and the respect for the human body.

Mega Body Paint México is defined as an artistic, cultural and educational family concerned with social causes aiming to erase the ghoulish distortion towards body paint while impulsing young talents.

Body art explores the use of the human body as a vehicle for expression with the possibility to convey social criticism, as Jessy notes, Mega Body Paint México “presents body art both as a vehicle for artistic expression and for social criticism.”

In 2014, Mega Body Paint México organized a protest against the statements issued by José María Martínez, Head of the Family Commission at the time, who declared that the only acceptable family structure should be integrated by the figure of a mother, a father and their offspring, thus neglecting families structured otherwise.

That same year, Mega Body Paint México started Mega Procesión de las Catrinas, an event that revolves around The Calavera Catrina, Mexico's Grande Dame of Death, a creation by Mexican artist José Guadalupe Posada in 1912, aiming to preserve Mexican traditions.

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