The legacy of astronomer Guillermo Haro

Haro became an insatiable promoter of science and astronomy in Mexico and the world

Guillermo Haro, the first Mexican astronomer elected to the Royal Astronomical Society
He led Mexico’s National Astronomical Observatory for two decades, as well as the Tonantzintla Astrophysics Observatory - Photo: Taken from the UNAM’s website
English 27/04/2020 13:29 Newsroom/EL UNIVERSAL in English Mexico City Actualizada 17:52
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Astronomer Guillermo Haro was born in Mexico in 1913. He studied philosophy and later embarked on a career in astronomy, becoming one of the most prominent Mexican scientists of all time.

His biggest contribution to astronomy was the discovery of a type of planetary nebulae named Herbig-Haro objects, as well as the discovery of flare stars, red and blue bright stars, located in the Orion constellation. These contributions led to Haro becoming the first Mexican astronomer elected to the Royal Astronomical Society, in 1959.

Haro's legacy is palpable. He founded the National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics, and Electronics, and an observatory in Sonora.

The astronomer worker at the Harvard University Observatory from 1943 to 1944. He led Mexico’s National Astronomical Observatory for two decades, as well as the Tonantzintla Astrophysics Observatory.

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He was also the youngest member of prestigious Colegio Nacional after joining at the age of 40. Haro became an insatiable promoter of science and astronomy in Mexico and the world.

Hailed by writer Alfonso Reyes as "the priest of the telescope", Haro discovered planetary nebulae and astronomical objects including the "Three Sisters" (Tres Marías) a part of the Orion's Belt constellation, as well as the Herbing-Haro objects.

Guillermo Haro was married to writer Elena Poniatowska from 1968-1981, who later wrote a book titled The Universe or Nothing, which was published in 2013.

"Applying science and technology with a profound humanist spirit; to lead these efforts to well-being and peace is a paramount task of our time.", said Haro, who died in Mexico City in 1988.

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