Hollywood Academy pays homage to Guillermo del Toro

The event was hosted by Michael Mann, who referred to the director as "a true visionary" who can make movies from dreams.

During his hour and a half-long conversation with Academy Museum Director Kerry Brougher, del Toro discussed his influences and obsessions. (Photo: AP)
English 08/10/2015 11:36 EFE Actualizada 11:36
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The Hollywood Academy held a symposium in honor of Mexican filmmaker Guillermo del Toro, stressing on his career and his ability to invent worlds and his fascination for monsters.

The event on Wednesday was hosted by Michael Mann, who referred to the director from Guadalajara as "a true visionary" who can make movies from dreams, like he did in 'In The Labyrinth' (El laberinto del fauno).

During his hour and a half-long conversation with Academy Museum Director Kerry Brougher, del Toro, who received best screenplay Oscar nomination for 'In The Labyrinth', discussed his influences and obsessions.

The Mexican director, who reached the symposium after recording his intervention in the TV program 'Jimmy Kimmel Live!' revealed before a packed house at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater, at California's Beverley Hills, 'El espinazo del diablo' (The Devil's Backbone) is his favorite from among all the movies he has made, followed by 'In The Labyrinth' and 'Crimson Peak'.

'Crimson Peak', starring Mia Wasikowska, Tom Hiddleston and Jessica Chastain, is scheduled for release in the U.S. on Oct. 16.

Del Toro spoke at length about his love for David Lean's 'Great Expectations', a film he feels "very close" to, as he does to all of Charles Dickens' works for their "poetry" and the "fairytale" atmosphere.

He said his own universe was the result of all types of art that inspired him as a child, whether they were movies, literature or paintings.

He also confessed his fascination for monsters since the age of five or six, and that David Lynch was his favorite director in the horror genre because his works are "based on real nightmares."

Finally, between clips of landmark films like 'Freaks' (1932) and 'The Bride of Frankenstein' (1935), he said he advised youngsters to feed their curiosity, and concluded saying "movies are a refuge for people who want to believe."

 

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