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Archeologists find ancient snails

The research project was developed by San Luis Potosí's Autonomous University (UASLP), in collaboration with the INAH's Archeology Council

Mexican archeologists discover snails from the Pleistocene
The snails found in San Luis Potosí – Photo: Taken from the INAH's website
English 08/01/2019 12:28 Notimex Mexico City Actualizada 12:31
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The National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH) carried out excavations in Cedral, San Luis Potosí, and discovered petrified snail remains that reveal the paleontological richness of the area.

According to a statement released by the institute, they found animal remains that date back to the Late Pleistocene era, an era during which the modern human being was born and when glaciations took place.

They found around 263 micro-mollusks, which indicates that a long time ago, the dessert was full of fresh water. This discovery reinforces the theory proposed by archeologists Lorena Mirambell and José Luis Lorenzo Bautista.

Both archeologists visited Cedral along with members from the Prehistory Department, they studied the different aspects of the region and concluded that this place used to be a spring.

The team identified 14 species: 5 are from freshwater species, an amphibian, and the rest are terrestrial.

The researchers also found the remains of homes from 31,000 years ago, lithic materials, and skeletal remains.

Also, they explained that La Amapola ranch, which is located in the Cedral area, is emblematic for the study of the first inhabitants of the American continent. It's one of the few places that has archeological-paleontological evidence that belongs to the transition period between the Pleistocene and Holocene.

The research project was developed by San Luis Potosí's Autonomous University (UASLP), in collaboration with the INAH's Archeology Council.

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