COVID-19: Mexican migrants in the U.S. are in a limbo

Mexican immigrants in the U.S. are in need of medical and financial help

COVID-19: Mexican migrants in the U.S. are in a limbo
In New York, 34% of the dead were Latinos, even when they are only 29% of the city’s inhabitants - Photo: Courtesy of the U.S. Navy
English 13/04/2020 09:19 Mexico City Editorial Actualizada 09:28

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As we know, COVID-19 affects people from all ethnicities despite their economic conditions, as it became evident when it spread to over 200 countries. Nevertheless, there are places where there seems to be an exception. For example, in the U.S., where African Americans and Latinos have been especially affected by the coronavirus pandemic; this also highlights the prevailing inequality

In New York, 34% of the dead were Latinos, even when they are only 29% of the city’s inhabitants and in the case of African Americans, they are 28% of the dead when they are only 22% of the population. However, Chicago has even more alarming numbers: 68% coronavirus-related deaths were registered among the black community although they only represent 30% of the inhabitants. 

Therefore, during this health crisis, Mexican migrants are in limbo in both Mexico and the U.S. In an interview with EL UNIVERSAL, members of NGO Migrants Promoting Development discussed unemployment, abandonment, and overcrowded living conditions in the Mexican community, factors that make them more vulnerable to the pandemic.  

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In regards to Mexico’s consulates, the website only redirects them to the U.S. government’s website. The NGO explains that out of a community formed by 315,000 people, only 15% would be able to obtain government aid because only very few of them have a social security number.
 
For the U.S. government, Mexican immigrants became invisible once again even when they contribute to the economy and are the foundations of different sectors such as construction, agriculture, and services.

Amid the COVID-19 crisis, Mexico has shown support for Mexicans abroad, especially those stranded in other countries while they were on vacation. In the case of Mexican migrants living in the U.S., Mexican authorities should take the necessary measures and not abandon a community that sends millions of dollars to Mexico every month. In times of economic stagnation and a public health crisis, the right thing to do is to help them. 

Although COVID-19 does not discriminate between ethnicities and nationalities, the reality is that depending on the economic status, the virus can become more lethal.

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