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Mexico and Uruguay call for dialogue to resolve Venezuelan crisis

Mexico and Uruguay said that negotiations were the only acceptable way to achieve a peaceful solution to the deepening political and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela, as they welcomed the release from jail of key opposition figure Edgar Zambrano, vice president of the Venezuelan National Assembly

Mexico and Uruguay call for dialogue to resolve Venezuelan crisis
An anti-government demonstrator holds a representation of Venezuela's national flag in front of a burning barricade – Photo: Rodrigo Abd/AP
English 20/09/2019 13:30 Newsroom & Agencies Mexico City Stefanie Eschenbacher, Sharay Angulo, Corina Pons, Shri Navaratnam & Stephen Coates/REUTERS &EUROPA PRESS Actualizada 13:51
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On Thursday, Mexico and Uruguay said that negotiations were the only acceptable way to achieve a peaceful solution to the deepening political and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela, as they welcomed the release from jail of a top opposition figure.

In a joint statement, Mexico and Uruguay called for the release of all prisoners held in circumstances similar to key opposition figure Edgar Zambrano, vice president of the Venezuelan National Assembly, who was released on September 16.
 

“The governments of Mexico and Uruguay reiterate, as we have done on February 6 in Montevideo, that dialogue and negotiations are the only acceptable way to achieve a peaceful solution for the situation Venezuela faces,” the statement said.

Mexico’s Foreign Affairs Ministry (SRE) has said that it hopes current dialogue efforts take place in an “inclusive [frame] of civility and peace” to achieve “real and democratic [solutions] that promote trust between parties.”

Zambrano was arrested four months ago on treason charges. He was released following what allies said was strong popular pressure, but authorities said his case remains open.
 

On Sunday, Venezuela’s opposition said a dialogue mediated by Norway to try to resolve the political crisis had ended, six weeks after President Nicolás Maduro suspended his country’s participation.

On Monday, the government responded by announcing a deal with smaller opposition parties to resolve the South American country’s deep political divide by reforming the National Electoral Commission, accused of bias in favor of the ruling socialists.
 

That deal was not backed by allies of opposition leader Juan Guaidó.

This week, Guaidó has revealed that he proposed Maduro a transitional government in which none of them were present to guide the country to “real” presidential elections, to reactivate Venezuelan economy and to allow humanitarian aid to enter the country.
 

Maduro did not inform Norway’s foreign ministry, which was mediating a dialogue between his government and Guaido, about a side deal with a smaller sector of the opposition before it was announced earlier this week, a member of Guaido’s negotiating team said on Wednesday.
 

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