25 | MAR | 2019
La Diosa Arrodillada (The Kneeling Goddess) by Gavaldón. (Photo: Archive )

Mexican Cinema's Golden Age at MoMa

17/06/2015
21:44
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The Museum of Modern Art in New York (MoMA) will present the film exhibition 'Mexico at Midnight: Film Noir from Mexican Cinema's Golden Age'

By Newsroom 

The Museum of Modern Art in New York (MoMA) will present the film exhibition 'Mexico at Midnight: Film Noir from Mexican Cinema's Golden Age' which will be held from July 23 to 29. 

The Mexican cinema's época de oro extended from the mid-1930s to the early 1960s, when Mexican films dominated Latin America and made significant inroads into Spanish-speaking communities in the U.S. 

During and following World War II, Mexican popular filmmaking achieved a level of quality fully comparable to Hollywood, with great performers such as Dolores del Río, Pedro Armendáriz, María Félix, and Arturo de Córdova, and world-class directors like Roberto Gavaldón, Julio Bracho, and Emilio Fernández, cinematographers such as Gabriel Figueroa and Alex Phillips, and the technical facilities of Churubusco Studios. 

MoMA will screen seven films made between 1943 and 1952 by Roberto Gavaldón, Julio Bracho and Tito Davidson.

The films are En La Palma de tu mano (In the Palm of Your Hand), La Otra (The Other One), La Noche avanza (Night Falls), and La Diosa arrodillada (The Kneeling Goddess) by Gavaldón.

Crepusculo (Twilight), and Distinto amanecer (Another Dawn) by Bracho. 

Que Dios me perdone (May God Forgive Me) by Davison. 

Mantente al día con el boletín de El Universal

 

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