Researchers unravel the mystery surrounding the Xalla Palace in Teotihuacan

15/03/2020
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15:11
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Newsroom/EL UNIVERSAL in English
Researchers unravel the mystery surrounding the Xalla Palace in Teotihuacan
The Great Jaguar of Xalla is displayed as part of the "Teotihuacan, City of Gods" exhibition in Mexico City's anthropology museum May 21, 2009 - Photo: Héctor Montaño/EFE

Researchers unravel the mystery surrounding the Xalla Palace in Teotihuacan

15/03/2020
15:11
Newsroom/EL UNIVERSAL in English
Mexico City
-A +A
For decades, archaeologists and scientists have been studying the ancient civilization that once inhabited Teotihuacan

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In recent years, experts have been working to understand the ancient civilization that once inhabited in Teotihuacan. However, one of the most intriguing buildings erected by this culture is the Xalla Palace, where the elite resided and which was apparently burned down during a riot.

During a press conference, Emiliano Melgar, the head of the Templo Mayor Museum, explained that Xalla had similarities with average neighborhoods such as Teopancazco and Oztoyahualco: trapezoidal plates of serpentine, a mineral, came from the same deposit in Tehuitzingo, Puebla.

Recommended: Evidence suggests Teotihuacan collapsed in 570 A.D.

Nevertheless, the Xalla Palace also displays materials that showcased the status of the Teotihuacan elite: “Flint sourced from Morelos, travertine from Puebla and Oaxaca, obsidian from the Neovolcanic Transverse Axis, serpentine and quartz from Guerrero and Oaxaca, and jadeite from Guatemala.”

Researchers Norma Valentín and Adrián Velázquez found and analyzed shells and remains of fauna.

Recommended: Teotihuacán, the secrets buried in the ancient underworld
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In Xalla, researchers have found 420 shells; therefore, scientists were able to understand how important mollusks were for Teotihuacans. Moreover, in order to obtain the shells, they required divers and commerce networks to sell them at high prices, especially because they were used for rituals, jewelry, and music instruments.

The most valued species were the Spondylus and the Pinctada mazatlanica.

Researcher Norma Valentín found the remains of quails, hares, turkeys, seagulls, horned owls, and wolves.

Evidence reveals Mayan elites lived in Teotihuacán

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