Mexico-U.S. border: drug cartels and migration

The U.S. government's concern about the power of criminal organizations increased after the latest violent attacks in Mexico, such as the unsuccessful arrest of Ovidio Guzmán, El Chapo’s son, or the massacre of nine American Mormons in Sonora

Mexico-U.S. border: drug cartels and migration
An officer of the National Guard at the Mexico-US border – Photo: Christian Torres/EL UNIVERSAL
English 14/11/2019 14:26 Mexico City Víctor Sancho Actualizada 14:33

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The U.S. government justified its pressure to improve security in the Mexico-U.S. border because it is “100% controlled by drug cartels,” which implies human and drug trafficking that affects the migration system. The concern of the U.S. about the power of criminal organizations increased after the latest violent attacks in Mexico, such as the unsuccessful arrest of Ovidio Guzmán, El Chapo’s son, or the massacre of nine American Mormons in Sonora.

Have you heard about the sordid story behind the LeBarón family?

“The Mexican side of the border is 100% controlled by drug cartels, nothing goes by without them knowing,” said Mark Morgan, Acting Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), in a hearing at the Senate about the “unprecedented migration” experienced in the U.S. in the south border.

Morgan was in charge of showing the U.S. government’s concern about a migration crisis that, despite the good numbers recently, “is not over yet.” They calculate in a “conservative” way 150,0000 illegal migrants have crossed the border this year.

The fact would be worse without the “alliance” and effort of countries such as Mexico, said Morgan, who alluded to the two main reasons he considers illegal migrants figures have a downward trend in the U.S.: the presence of the National Guard in the border and the success of the Migrants Protection Protocol that returns migrants to Mexico while they wait for a hearing in U.S. courts.

Did you know Mexico deportations of Central American migrants hit record high?

In the meanwhile, the Trump administration already has a new National Security Minister, the fifth in over three years, although interim: Chad Wolf was confirmed by the Senate (54-41).

It is believed that he will work along with anti-migrant Ken Cuccinelli, who was Trump’s favorite for the position but who was dismissed due to bureaucratic obstacles and opposition from the Congress.

The Ministry informed that it would begin to implement a measure that had been considered for a long time: denying work permits to asylum seekers. Just one day after the Southern Poverty Law Center published e-mails from Stephen Miller, Trump’s migration ideologue, with white supremacist and anti-migrant rhetoric messages.

Have you heard of the U.S. deeply-rooted hostility toward Mexico?

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