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García Luna's arrest calls Mexico's anti-drug trafficking war into question
García Luna worked for two former Presidents: Vicente Fox and Felipe Calderón - Photo: Miguel Espinosa/EL UNIVERSAL

García Luna's arrest calls Mexico's anti-drug trafficking war into question

11/12/2019
09:21
Mexico City
Editorial
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Genaro García Luna was accused of protecting drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán

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Genaro García Luna, an official who was key during Felipe Calderón's administration, was arrested by U.S. authorities after being accused of protecting drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán in exchange for bribes, participating in a drug trafficking network that targeted the U.S., and making false statements. All these accusations form a serious questioning against the war against organized crime, led by former PAN President Felipe Calderón.

El Chapo allegedly bribed high-ranking government officials

It is worrying that these accusations are made against a person who once led the National Security and Investigation Center (CISEN), the Federal Investigation Agency (AFI), and the Public Security Ministry. In fact, some versions indicate that García Luna was behind “El Chapo” Guzmán's rise in drug trafficking after he escaped a maximum-security prison in 2001, during the Vicente Fox administration. The former leader of the Sinaloa Cartel was on the run during two PAN administrations and until 2014, when Enrique Peña Nieto, PRI, was in office.

Furthermore, less than a year ago, during El Chapo's trial in the U.S., drug trafficker Jesús “El Rey” Zambada said he gave Genaro García over USD $6 million in bribes when he was the head of the AFI.

Did Peña and Calderón receive millions from drug cartel?

Genaro García Luna, along with former Supreme Court minister Eduardo Medina Mora, led the war against organized crime during the Felipe Calderón administration. While Medina Mora resigned from the Supreme Court after being accused of money laundering, now García Luna has been arrested by U.S. authorities in Dallas, Texas. These two downfalls call the strategy against crime into question because in case the accusations are true, the infiltration of drug cartels into the Mexican government would be revealed; moreover, this would also plan how Mexican cartels became so powerful.

Moreover, it is worrying that these accusations were made in a foreign country while in Mexico it seems like nobody discovered that drug trafficking organizations have penetrated the government's high spheres by bribing officials, especially those in charge of fighting the main criminals behind a national security risk.

Sinaloa Cartel's macabre plan

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