17 | AGO | 2019
5 Indigenous Mexican painters you should know
These artists portray their world view in their paintings - Photo: Taken from Rigoberto Gómez Sántiz's Facebook Page

5 Indigenous Mexican painters you should know

13/08/2019
16:23
Newsroom/EL UNIVERSAL in English
Mexico City
Alicia Pereda, Patricia Ramírez
-A +A
For Indigenous communities, art generates individual and collective memories

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Although in Mexico art and culture are not regarded as essential, art keeps flourishing and new artists launch successful careers despite difficult social and economic conditions.

A culture expert, Janet Cerqueda, explains that artistic expressions among Indigenous communities have two essential functions: “For Indigenous communities, painting is very important because it generates individual and collective memories. While the painter portrays their take on reality, this is full of elements that surrounded them while growing up, traditions, and their culture's world view.”

These are the five Indigenous painters taking the art industry by storm:

1. Darwin Cruz

Darwin Cruz Cruz is a 28-year-old painter from Chiapas. The painter is Chol and his first language is Mayan Chol. He enjoys drawing about his roots and the Indigenous communities' world views. According to A Life With Art, “his search is based in word of mouth between generations, the legends, and characters that appear in the Chol cosmovision. They believed that all mountains, rivers, and caves where protected by supernatural beings with human appearance, underworld spirits. He depicts the mysticism and the magic from his childhood and heritage.”

You can purchase his paintings here.

2. Filogonio García Calixto

Filogonio García was born in Oaxaca in 1979. His paintings pay homage to Oaxaca and the Mazatec culture through abstract forms, sacred art, and landscapes. He is proud to share his personal view on the landscapes that surrounded him when he was a child: the mountains and nature of Oaxaca, in harmony with the respect Mazatec culture has for mother nature. He also considers that art could have a great impact on the Indigenous communities, as it could become a safe path for progress.

You can find his Fondearte profile here.

3. Gregorio Méndez Nava
Painter Gregorio Méndez Nava was born in Cuetzalan, Puebla. Thanks to his talent, he has told the story of the Maseual people. He has portrayed his culture through paintings depicting women and dancers. The Náhuatl artist teaches painting, sculpture, music, and literature workshops to children.

4. Jorge Domínguez
Jorge Domínguez is from Veracruz. His work portrays nature, culture, and ancient gods. He has emphasized the importance of being in touch with his roots, especially in the age of technology and globalization. He has exhibited his paintings in Mexico and abroad and often teaches painting workshops to children and teenagers in his hometown.

You can find his blog here.

5. Rigoberto Gómez Sántiz
Painter Rigoberto Gómez Sántiz was born in Chiapas. His art revolves around his culture and women, who have passed down their ancestral knowledge and wisdom to younger generations. The painter explains that he has been fascinated by his roots and culture since he was a child. He also uses art as a tool to denounce inequality in his community.

 

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