Human trafficking and forced labor: slavery in the 21st century

Mexico's Human Rights Commission said that human trafficking is the third most profitable illegal business, surpassed only by drug and arms trafficking
Photo: El Universal/Files
02/12/2016
15:38
Dennis A. García / Newsroom
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Although it is prohibited by the Constitution, slavery continues in Mexico and takes different forms such as human trafficking, sexual and labor exploitation, child labor, forced begging, forced marriage, and forced recruitment of children for use in armed conflicts, said the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH)

On the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, the Human Rights body headed by the ombudsman Luis Raúl González Pérez, called on authorities and society to end human trafficking, “the modern 21st century slavery.”

The CNDH said that human trafficking is the third most profitable illegal business, surpassed only by drug and arms trafficking.

According to the U.N. report, human trafficking generates US$35 billion in illegal profits per year.

“This is not only against the freedom and dignity of people, but against their life itself. We emphasize the need to combat impunity, as well as to promote the coordinated action of the authorities responsible for public security and justice to face this crime, which causes indelible traces in the victims," González said.

Here is a list of facts and figures released by the United Nations:

Facts and Figures:

-Almost 21 million people are victims of forced labor – 11.4 million women and girls and 9.5 million men and boys.

-Almost 19 million victims are exploited by private individuals or enterprises and over 2 million by the state or rebel groups.

-Of those exploited by individuals or enterprises, 4.5 million are victims of forced sexual exploitation.

-Forced labor in the private economy generates US$ 150 billion in illegal profits per year.

-Domestic work, agriculture, construction, manufacturing and entertainment are among the sectors most concerned.

-Migrant workers and indigenous people are particularly vulnerable to forced labor.

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