Millionaire subsidies, yet no sustainability

As time went by, fishermen learned to depend on subsidies and, given the lack of a strategy, they began to administer the fishing areas of the country unevenly - Photo by Iniciativa dataMares MX (Enrique Alvarado, Alejandro Melgoza and Andrés M. Estrada)
English 20/04/2018 10:58 Mexico Iniciativa dataMares MX Actualizada 11:01
Guardando favorito...

According to experts, the investment of the federal government in the fishing industry isn't promoting a sustainable activity

Fishing in Mexican waters implies spending on food, ice, oil, wages, and spare parts but above all, fuel

Guardando favorito...
Fishing in Mexican waters implies spending on food, ice, oil, wages, and spare parts but above all, fuel

According to some of the fishermen interviewed, subsidies aren't given to “screwed fishermen” and there is an structural fault in the fishing industry: an uneven management of subsidies and the lack of clarity in the objectives of the fisheries administration

Guardando favorito...
According to some of the fishermen interviewed, subsidies aren't given to “screwed fishermen” and there is an structural fault in the fishing industry: an uneven management of subsidies and the lack of clarity in the objectives of the fisheries administration

Rashid Sumaila, a researcher at the University of British Columbia in Canada, classifies subsidies as “good” when they focus on productivity without exceeding catch rates; “bad” when they are given without controlled processes; and “ugly” when the results are unknown

Guardando favorito...
Rashid Sumaila, a researcher at the University of British Columbia in Canada, classifies subsidies as “good” when they focus on productivity without exceeding catch rates; “bad” when they are given without controlled processes; and “ugly” when the results are unknown

“Subsidies aren't for the sustainability of fishing, they exist for political control and for the benefit of interests that, in many cases, are protected by corrupt processes,” accuses Senator Ernesto Ruffo, head of the Fisheries Commission at the Upper Chamber

Guardando favorito...
“Subsidies aren't for the sustainability of fishing, they exist for political control and for the benefit of interests that, in many cases, are protected by corrupt processes,” accuses Senator Ernesto Ruffo, head of the Fisheries Commission at the Upper Chamber

 Rashid Sumaila, a researcher at the University of British Columbia in Canada, classifies subsidies as “good” when they focus on productivity without exceeding catch rates; “bad” when they are given without controlled processes; and “ugly” when the results are unknown.
Read more here
bg

Guardando favorito...