Ayotzinapa: Mexico's historical debt

Authorities could prosecute former officials such as Jesús Murillo Karam and Tomás Zerón

Ayotzinapa: Mexico's historical debt
It's been five years since the 43 students went missing - Photo: Jorge Dan López/REUTERS
English 24/09/2019 09:13 Mexico City Editorial Actualizada 09:19

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Few events in Mexico's modern history have shocked society, authorities, and the justice system more than the enforced disappearance of 43 students in Iguala, in the state of Guerrero, on September 26-27, five years ago.

The former administration was marked by its late response to the crime. The attempts to deliver justice culminated in a so-called historical truth that left a lot of questions unanswered and dismissed the opinion of the Independent Experts Interdisciplinary Group, who reviewed the case.

For the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, solving the case and would bring peace to the country. In an interview with EL UNIVERSAL, the commission's director said that the name of those responsible should be revealed, even if there are high-ranking officials among them. She said that that would “magnify the justice system.”

Forty-three students who were traveling by bus could not disappear without local authorities finding out or having information. After five years, the case has not been explained or solved; this has taken too long. Although the current government is not characterized by its promptness, it has held several meeting with the victims' parents and has listened to their demands, in contrast with the previous administration.

The head of the Inter-American Commission is right when she says that the new investigation hasn't moved as quickly as it was expected and that it is necessary to investigate the high-ranking officials who might be involved in a crime or who obstructed the investigations.

A few days ago, it was revealed that authorities are looking to prosecute former officials such as Jesús Murillo Karam and Tomás Zerón, after 24 people involved in the case were released from jail. The victims' parents have insisted on taking legal action against former officials, nevertheless, this shouldn't become the main goal.

It is true that the testimonies of witnesses should be investigated, testimonies such as the one published by EL UNIVERSAL on Monday because it indicates that statements could have been obtained through torture, which makes in invalid.

The most important part is to learn if police, local authorities, state authorities, and federal authorities were implicated and what happened to the 43 Ayotzinapa students. It is urgent for the government to define its action plan and not to create false expectations for the parents.
 

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