11 | NOV | 2019
Competitiveness: Mexico's biggest challenge
Although Mexico is an emerging economy, it still has a long way to go - Photo: Edgard Garrido/REUTERS

Competitiveness: Mexico's biggest challenge

09/10/2019
09:30
Mexico City
Editorial
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The World Economic Forum presented its most recent competitiveness report

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Every country projects an image to the outside world. For many years, many of them have portrayed the image of a positive, egalitarian, and developing country, while others have maintained a mediocre profile.

In order to establish reliable parameters, international organizations develop methods to analyze issues such as health, quality of life, security, among others. Then, the results are used to learn each country's strengths and weaknesses.

On Tuesday, the World Economic Forum presented its most recent competitiveness report. The organization evaluated 141 countries but Mexico did not do well. In the Global Competitiveness Report 2019, Mexico dropped two places: it went from 46th place to 48th place.

For the World Economic Forum, competitiveness is the result of institutions, policies, and certain factors that determine the productiveness level of a country. For this reason, the study evaluates the 12 pillars: infrastructure, macroeconomic stability, abilities, financial system, innovation capacity, health, institutions, adopting information technologies, product market, labor market, size of the market, and business dynamism. Therefore, this broad spectrum offers a diagnosis of the areas where the country has to focus on.

Mexico presented lags in the first six categories. The area where the country deteriorated the most was in macroeconomic stability since it dropped six places; another sharp fall was registered in infrastructure, as the country dropped to the 54th place.

Minor progress has been made in regards to institutions, adopting information technologies, product market, and labor market: the adoption of IT, from the 76th place to 74th place; market product went to from the 54th to the 53rd; and in regards to the labor market, Mexico went from the 105th place to the 98th place. In regards to Mexican institutions, there was minor progress, although it is in is the category where Mexico is behind the most: it went from the 105th place to the 98th place. In this classification, the three main burdens for the country are included. In regards to organized crime, Mexico was placed in the 140th position out of 141; in homicides, it was placed in the 129th position, and in the trust in the services provided by police, it was placed on the 139th position, and in regards to press freedom, it occupies the 118th position.

In regards to the size of the market and business dynamism, Mexico showed no progress.

This report confirms the information documented in Mexico. Insecurity is the main obstacle that prevents economic dynamism to improve in Mexico.

The country can't wait any longer. Although there has been progress in the short term, it can take a long time to get rid of the stigma of being an insecure country.
 

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