God's eye: a Wixáritari tradition
The live in the Sierra Madre Occidental, a mountain range in western Mexico - Photo: Juan Carlos Reyes García/EL UNIVERSAL

God's eye: a Wixáritari tradition

17/11/2019
15:31
Itzel Porras
Mexico City
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The Wixáritari have preserved this amulet for hundreds of years

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God's eye is a symbol of power and protection. This symbol is essential for the Wixárika culture since it is the means through which the god Kauyumari, a blue deer, sees and understands the mysteries of the world.

The God's eye, or si'kuli, is a wooden cross covered with colorful threads that form a symmetrical patterns that represent the 5 cardinal points: north, south, east, west, and the center. For the Huichol people, the center is the origin of everything.

Huichol art in Mexico City

This symbol is traditionally given to children when they are born so that they are always protected but it is also gifted to children when they are sick or as a way to connect with the spiritual world.

Read more about Huichol art here

In the Wáxarika communities, the father is the one who makes the amulet and every year, as the child grows older, they add more layers.

The colors used to create God's eye also have an important meaning, for example, blue is the color of rain and purple is a symbol of life.

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The Wixáritari live in the Sierra Madre Occidental, a mountain range in western Mexico, in Jalisco and Nayarit.

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