Mexican art attracted 126.000 people in Texas

"Mexico 1900-1950" is the second most important exhibition presented in Dallas in 10 years
Photo: Courtesy of Ministry of Culture
22/07/2017
12:03
Notimex
Mexico
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The exhibition “Mexico 1900-1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco and the avant-garde,” recorded an attendance of 126 thousand people in the Museum of Art of Dallas, Texas, United States.

The exhibition, which concluded on Sunday, July 16, exhibited 200 works among paintings, sculptures, photographies, drawings, audiovisuals, and documents, in a bilingual format set-up to establish a cultural bridge between Mexico and the US, informed the Ministry of Culture.

The Mexican curator, Agustín Arteaga, declared that it is the second most important exhibition to be presented in Dallas in 10 years, only surpassed by the exhibition on the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun, mounted in 2007.

"That tells us about the importance of Mexican culture and the way it continues to attract thousands of visitors with its artists," said the director of the Dallas Museum of Art.

The show was exhibited in Dallas, after being displayed at the Grand Palais in Paris, France, where it had an attendance of over 230 thousand visitors, with works by artists such as Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, Ángel Zárraga, Tina Modotti, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Rufino Tamayo, among others.

It covered four thematic axes: the influence of 19th-century traditions; the strengthening of the Mexican school of painting and the influence of the Revolution; artists influenced by great social movements; and the work of Mexican artists in the United States.

In “Mexico 1900-1950,” the avant-gardist of America and Europe were intertwined with the cultural roots of Mexico and its native people, creating a great panorama within the currents of universal modern art.

mr

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