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Rarámuri native travels to Marseille

Silvino Cubesare, a Rarámuri athlete considered one of the best, will participate in the international Ultimate Race 2017. This time, he will run 64 km
Photo: Íñigo Arredondo/EL UNIVERSAL
26/05/2017
16:05
Íñigo Arredondo
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3 weeks ago, Silvino Cubesare's major concern was the cow stolen from his ranch. Yes, in the Sierra Tarahumara in Huisuchil, Batopilas, state of Chihuahua. Now, his concern is whether he got a window seat or a corridor seat on the plane which will take him to France in order to participate this May 26, in the international race known as the “Ultimate Race Marseille 2017,” where he will run 64 kilometers looking for victory.

Silvino will compete today in Marseille along with 3 other native ultramarathon runners of “light feet”, they are Arnulfo Químare, Ignacio Estrada y Miguel Lara.

Since Silvino began competing, almost 20 years ago, he has managed to combine his life as a farmer and as a professional athlete. The former gives him food and the latter money to pay for the education of his 6 children.

The prizes he has received have also provided him with financial compensations, ranging from MXN$25 thousand to MXN$40 thousand pesos.

When Silvino received the call informing him that the municipal government of Guachochi would pay for the expenses of the trip to France, he had not even spent 5 days in his home when he arrived from another competition.

“I think I spend more time in other places than in Guachochi or the ranch, I'm not there more than a week. I'm no longer from Guachochi or Huisuchil, I'm from everywhere.” In 2015, he ran other traditional routes like the ones of Urique and Guachochi, and also in Japan and Spain.

In order to go to France, he had to decline an invitation to run 100 miles in Chile. After his return from Europe, he has 3 more competitions with potentially good pay: Coahuila, Taxco and La Sinforosa. “Right now I'm traveling for my kids, for their school. Some races give us economic support for participating. That's why I go. I also like to compete for victory. But right now is for them. For their schooling and food.”

He is 39 years old and says that he will stop running until his feet can no longer continue. Perhaps in 2 or 3 years. “I'm already tired, because of the trips. I want to devote myself to my house, to agriculture. It's tiring sitting around for many hours. From Guachochi to Chihuahua the trip takes 4 hours by car… By plane, it's much more narrow. You can't stretch well.”

His plan to run so that his children receive the best education possible seems to be working out. Two of them already surpassed his father's level of education, which is primary school.

Silvino anticipates that as long as there are sponsors that support him, he will continue running. In France, he will participate with younger rarámuri, who have seen in Silvino's steps a way to professionalize the “light feet.”

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