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Rethinking migration
Several migrant caravans have entered Mexico in hopes of being granted asylum in the U.S. - Photo: Ueslei Marcelino/REUTERS

Rethinking migration

21/03/2019
09:37
Mexico City
Editorial
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The lack of opportunities, violence, and economy in their countries have forced thousands of migrants from Central America and the Caribbean to travel to the United States

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The lack of opportunities, violence, and economy in their countries have forced thousands of migrants from Central America and the Caribbean to travel to the United States in search of a new life. Nevertheless, the previous stop is Mexico, which has seeked the humanitarian treatment for migrants by allowing their temporary stay in the country, despite Donald Trump's anti-immigration policy.

The presence of migrants who look to get to the United States is a phenomenon that has become more relevant in the last months. Two recent events show that our country is in the midst of a terrible scenario, in regards to the northern neighbor and in regards to thousands of migrants who are trying to leave a life full of poverty in their countries behind.

The outpouring of Central American migrants in Tapachula, Chiapas, when over 300 Cubans and over 400 Hondurans entered the country, should make a difference for the migration policy designed by the federal government. The difficult situation they have endured in their countries doesn't justify, for example, their violent treatment of the workers from the National Migration Institute (INM).

For decades, Mexico has been a country of refuge that welcomes the migrants rejected by the U.S. but it receives no support for undertaking this task. There are cases where the countries who welcome migrants are granted economic benefits, such as the African nations who have been financed after signing agreements with Europe. For example, Argelia and Tunisia, retain migrants in their territories in exchange for financial compensations.

In the meeting between Mexican president Andrés Manuel López Obrador and Jared Kushner, a high-ranking U.S. official and president Trump's son-in-law, they discussed an agreement to invest USD $10,000 million for a development program in Mexico and Central America.

It is work questioning if part of the resources will be allocated to the migration phenomenon if there will be money to contain the outpouring of Central Americans migrating to the U.S.; if they are looking for them to stay in Mexico permanently or if it is an incentive to provide jobs for them in the country.

For how long will Mexico endure this situation? The arrival of more migrants will require the use of public resources and policies to tackle the locals' rejection towards migrant, as in the case of Tijuana. As a result, there is a time bomb that will eventually explode. Humanizing the migration policy is necessary, as well as analyzing the whole panorama to make the best decision for the country.

Artículo

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