AMLO to the rescue

Yesterday, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador reminded many of the moment when his predecessor General Lázaro Cárdenas del Río decreed the nationalization of the oil industry

AMLO to the rescue
President López Obrador - Photo: Jorge Serratos/EL UNIVERSAL
English 16/12/2018 09:33 Mexico City Newspaper Leader Actualizada 09:37

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There's talk about another Pemex rescue. Yesterday, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador reminded many of the moment when his predecessor General Lázaro Cárdenas del Río decreed the nationalization of the oil industry, which until 1938 had been in the hands of Americans and British. Cárdenas took advantage of a worldwide crisis, as well as the workers' evident discontent with their working and economic conditions.

Now, López Obrador claims he's not exaggerating when he says his rescue plan is just as decisive or even more for the history of the country and the national oil industry than what Cárdenas did 80 years ago. And after it seems like previous governments chose to let Pemex sink to then dismantle it and auction it off to the best bidder, it becomes urgent to create a strategy to reposition Pemex as a leader in its field.

And in the face of the failed results of an equally failed energy reform, which didn't achieve its purpose to triple the national oil production, now this new government claims that with its so-called Hydrocarbons National Plan, the current production will double by increasing the production from 1,750,000 barrels per days to an estimated 2,400,000 barrels per day, by the end of his presidency. How will this be accomplished? Basically by opting for the modernization of the six refineries in the country, as well as the construction of a new one, besides relocating Pemex to Ciudad del Carmen, Campeche and letting the union choose its leader, without intervention.

And the new President doesn't seem to hide the fact that in his strategy, it's been planned to apply the increase in productivity criteria he has criticized from neoliberalism. It's widely-known that Pemex has a much larger workforce than other oil companies of its size, and also included the consolidation of an elite bureaucracy over 40 years ago, disguised under the illusion of an “administration of abundance.”

The President's plan won't be carried out if there's no commitment from all the parts that form Pemex. The oil workers enjoy benefits all the workers on the country lack. Forcing the union to adopt austerity policies could free resources for other productive actions.

 

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