Mexico deports more Central Americans than the U.S.

According to civic organizations, Mexico acts as a wall and border patrol to the U.S.
Mexico deports more Central Americans than the U.S.
Central Americans travel through Mexico in hopes of entering the U.S. - Photo: Pedro Pardo/AFP
23/10/2018
15:21
José Meléndez, corresponsal
San José
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Mexico deports the largest number of Guatemalans, Salvadorans, and Hondurans, from 2015 to 2018, and it surpassed the number of Central Americans deported from the U.S. from 2011 to 2014, the main destiny of undocumented migrants, say Guatemala, El Salvador y Honduras governments.

From January 2015 to September 2018, Mexico deported 436,125 Guatemalans, Salvadorans, and Hondurans, while the U.S. deported 293,813 migrants, according to the numbers obtained by EL UNIVERSAL.

From 2011 to 2014, the U.S., deported 389,673 Guatemalans, Salvadorans, and Hondurans, and Mexico deported 325,560 Central Americans, according to the information. The Honduran government began to gather information in 2015, and the deportations information of Hondurans, from 2011 to 2014, was provided by Guatemala's Migration Institute and Hondura's Attention Center for Deported Migrants.

Mexico and the U.S. deported 729,938 Guatemalans, Salvadorans, and Hondurans from 2015 to September 2018, and 715,233 from January 2011 to December 2014; therefore, the period between 2015-2018 could surpass the 2011-2014 period by the end of the year.

Mexico is an immense wall to stop the migration of Central Americans,” says Karla Rivas, from Honduras, and the coordinator of the Jesuit Network with Central American Migrants, from Honduras: “Mexico has, in practice, the task of being the U.S.' police, and they're doing it with funding from the U.S.,” she added during an interview with EL UNIVERSAL.

The reports point that since Donald Trump took office in 2017, 139,452 Guatemalans, Salvadorans, and Hondurans were deported by plane to their home countries from the U.S. Mexico surpassed Donald Trump's administration of deported people from these three countries, with 141,367.

The deportations, by plane in the U.S. and by land in Mexico, alarmed the countries part of the Northern Triangle of Central America, which set the alarm in 2017 because of the social and economic impact they will suffer from Trump's policy of closed borders and strengthen the migratory rules.

Documented and undocumented, the migrants are essential for the economics part of the Triangle, because of the money they send to their countries and the deportations create a parallel financial risk.

In family remittances, which have been essential for their public finances during the last 25 years, the three countries received over USD $17,700 million in 2017 and over USD $15,057 million in 2016, 17.5% more, according to official numbers.

Intensity

Information from the Guatemalan Government, from January to September 2018, show that Mexico strengthened its control in the Guatemala-Mexico border, to prevent undocumented migrants from crossing towards the U.S. and increased the number of Central Americans deported to Guatemala by 128%, compared with 2017.

The “strengthening” of Mexico's migration policy is disguised in the plan that it has with Guatemala to fight cartels, says Julia González, coordinator of the Board for Guatemala Migrations: “The plan ended up being a mechanism to increase the migration control and detention filters of Central Americans,” she said during an interview with EL UNIVERSAL.

The number of Guatemalans, Salvadorans, Hondurans, and Nicaraguans deported by Mexico increased to 68,048, during 2018, compared to 29,760 deportations from January to September 2017, explained Guatemala's Migration.

Those numbers are lower than in 2016 when Mexico deported 93,163 Central Americans; while in 2015, it deported 120,065. There were a total of 72,128 deportations in 2017; 128,235 in 2016, and 158,789 in 2015.

The total deportations of Guatemalans, Salvadorans, Hondurans, and Nicaraguans between January 2015 and September 2018 reached 427,200, according to Guatemala.

The numbers from Honduras and El Salvador, in regards to the deportation of their citizens, differs from the information provided by Guatemala, where they enter after being deported.

Hondura's Consular and Migratory Observatory (Conmigho) determined that Mexico deported 165,022 Hondurans between 2015 to September 2018.

El Salvador's General Migrations and Foreign Citizens Bureau counted a total of 77,499 Salvadorans deported from Mexico since 2015.

Guatemala's Migration Department registered 193,604 deported Guatemalans by Mexico, between 2015 and 2018. The total number of deportations, using information from each government, is 436, 125, which surpasses the statistics provided by Guatemala, 427,200 deportations, by 8,925.

The deportations of Guatemalans carried out by the U.S. since 2015 amount to 137,325, according to Guatemala's Migration. The annual total went from 31,433 in 2015; to 35,465 in 2016; 32,833 in 2017; 37,584 from January to September 2018, which surpassed the three previous numbers.

Conmigho reported that there were 85,535 Hondurans deported by the U.S., against their will, from 2015 to 2018. El Salvador's General Migrations and Foreign Citizens Bureau registered 72,953 deportations during that same period. The total number of deportations from Central Americans, which are the main source of undocumented migrants in the U.S., is 293,813.

According to official information from the Triangle about the deportations from Mexico and the U.S. since 2015, Guatemala is on the first place, with 330,929; followed by Honduras with 248,557; and lastly El Salvador, with 150, 450.

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