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After the elections

Our electoral institutions have to go on – only then will we have certainty in future elections
After the elections
Ballots – Photo: Patricia Morales/EL UNIVERSAL
11/06/2018
09:02
Mexico City
Newspaper Leader by EL UNIVERSAL
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In an unprecedented exercise, the president of the Electoral Court of the Judicial branch of the Federation (TEPJF) Janine Otálora, and the President Councilor of the National Electoral Institute (INE) Lorenzo Córdova were interviewed together by EL UNIVERSAL to share their opinions regarding the current electoral process and the difficulties it represents.

The heads of the institutions in charge of organizing and validating the elections sent the message that despite Mexico is going through the most violent elections in recent memory and despite there is still much left to do to consolidate our democracy, both institutions are certain in their capacity to make the July 1 election a success, including the election results. Both rule out the “ghost of fraud” and the violence in the country being a threat to the elections.

The meeting of this two characters is relevant because of the criticisms both institutions have received due to to the incompatibility of their criteria in law interpretation. This is why, on the face of an alleged fight between these two institutions, Otálora and Córdova clarify that the differences between are natural of the counterweight system we have. In any case, they ensure these disagreements don't pose a threat to the elections.

Where is the risk of the elections? In the political players, according to them. Incredible to believe but true: it was the political parties themselves who built the rigid election system we have yet in the last decade they have decided to find loops and tricks to turn around the regulations approved by them.

The results of next July 1 will determine, predictably, another attempt of the parties to modify electoral laws and, perhaps, even alter the conformation of the INE and the TEPJF to adjust them to the interests of political parties. We'll have to see that possibility as a transparent and unbiased action undertaken by both authorities in upcoming elections. Only then will politicians be left without arguments to justify another attack on the election system.

Because we cannot forget that the strength of our institutions isn't only useful for the upcoming elections but to consolidate once and for all, democracy in Mexico.

In the end, what has to be preserved is the trust won although dwindled with years, in the system which arose after the fall of the ruling party in 2000. There is still enough margin to recover that trust and the conditions – according to Córdova and Otálora – are there.

The day after the elections institutions have to go on. Only then we will have certainty in future elections.

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