Criminals may get a reduced sentence under new law if they provide information

Until now the families of the victims negotiate with criminals on their own to obtain information about their missing relatives.
The four legislative initiatives submitted so far agree in reducing the sentences of those who provide veracious information on the whereabouts of the disappeared with government support. (Photo: Archive / EL UNIVERSAL)
13/12/2015
12:02
Newsroom
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26,000 missing people later, Mexico will have a comprehensive law against forced disappearances.

However, the Senate has to choose between discussing the proposal outside the constitutional time or doing it without forums to consult the families of the victims.

On December 10, President Enrique Peña Nieto sent to Congress the bill of the General Law for the Prevention and Punishment of Crimes related to Forced Disappearance. The ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the National Action Party (PAN) and the Democratic Revolution Party (PRD) had already sent their proposals.

After the measures announced by President Peña two months after the disappearance of 43 teachers in training of Ayotzinapa in 2014, the Executive Power had 180 days to submit its proposal, that was received by the Senate 26 days before the deadline expired.

The four legislative initiatives submitted so far agree in reducing the sentences of those who provide veracious information on the whereabouts of the disappeared with government support.

"For example, when an offender helps locate the victim alive, or his/her corpse, the sentence would be reduced by one third," said Héctor Cerezo, a member of the NGO Cerezo Committee, whose proposal is one of the three received by the Senate. "This does not have the purpose of helping the offender, but the families so that their ordeal ends sooner," he explained.

Until now the families of the victims negotiate with criminals on their own. They offer them intercession to get them transferred to another prison, to help them have TV in their cells, dropping criminal complaints and even cooking their favorite food, or giving to their families houses, cars or money.

 

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