Mexico's Foreign Policy: Principle of Non-intervention

Embodied in the Estrada Doctrine, it has been one of the cornerstones of Mexico's Foreign Policy since the beginning of the twentieth century
Mexico City circa 1936, in the background La Alameda Central. In the foreground, El Caballito, Hotel Francis, and the old building of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs - Photo: Photo library/ EL UNIVERSAL
16/12/2017
10:27
Gabriel Moyssen
Mexico City
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The principle of non-intervention has been one of the cornerstones of Mexico's Foreign Policy since the beginning of the twentieth century. It is embodied in the Estrada Doctrine developed by the journalist, politician, diplomat, poet, and novelist Genaro Estrada Félix (1887-1937) in defense of the sovereignty of nations against foreign intervention.
 

Genaro Estrada Félix was Delegate to the League of Nations, succeeded by the United Nations, from 1930 to 1932, ambassador to Spain, and Minister Plenipotentiary to Portugal and Turkey during a period in which the sovereignty of several nations such as Nicaragua, China, Ethiopia, and Czechoslovakia, was threatened by expansionism and the rise of fascism.

 

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Genaro Estrada Félix - Photo: Taken from INAH's media library website
The principle of non-intervention essentially consists of:
 
  • The rejection of political, economic and military interference in the internal affairs of nations.
  • The rejection of both acknowledgment or repudiation of governments rising to power without Constitution's ratification.
  • The rejection of the establishment of alliances between nations and the use of diplomacy to avoid wars, except for wars within the context of self-defense.
  • Respect for self-determination, which is the right of every nation to accept, maintain, or replace regulations.
Editing by Sofía Danis

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