Mexico and the U.S. to disrupt transnational crime

“Transnational criminal organizations don't care about borders or jurisdictions and their criminal acts cause deaths on both sides of the border”
“México and the U.S. are committed to maintain A shared vision and responsibility on disrupting transnational crime” - Photo: Taken from SRE México Twitter account
15/12/2017
19:05
Newsroom/EL UNIVERSAL in English
Mexico City
-A +A

The governments of Mexico and the United States agreed to fight against drug trafficking together, a joint effort that both countries emphasized that will not be affected by any other aspect of the bilateral relationship, namely North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) tensions, since security is a shared interest for both countries.

On Twitter, Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs wrote in Spanish: “Mexico's Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray participates in the Second Strategic High-level Dialogue on Disrupting Transnational Criminal Organizations, in Washington, D.C., along with Mexican and U.S. authorities.”

At the Second Strategic High-level Dialogue on Disrupting Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) held at the U.S. Department of State in Washington D.C. on December 14, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen M. Nielsen discussed with Mexico's Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray, Mexico's Secretary of Government Miguel Osorio, and Acting Attorney General Alberto Elías Beltrán.

The discussions revolved around “strategies to disrupt the multi-billion-dollar business model of those who profit from illicit drug trafficking and threaten both countries security,” according to a press release issued by U.S. Department of State.

Mexico's Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray opened his statement by saying “Mexico and the United States face a significant challenge, and we are facing it together since it’s a shared problem. Transnational criminal organizations don't care about borders or jurisdictions and their criminal acts cause deaths on both sides of the border. Thousands of Americans die from overdoses and thousands of Mexicans die from the violence that arises from the illegal drug trade,” emphasizing that both countries will be able to overcome the problem by working together.

Videgaray concluded by stating that a bilateral cooperation in security is “a comprehensive effort and an effort on which we are working based on the premise of shared responsibility and trust.”

Moreover, Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong insisted that "the security of our populations is a superior issue for both governments" while Alberto Elías Beltrán said that in his meetings with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions "there were no complaints or comments" about poppy crops eradication in Mexican territory.

Read Mexico's Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray full statement.

Read U.S. Department of State press release.

sg

Mantente al día con el boletín de El Universal

 

COMENTARIOS