Mexico and the U.S. define border cooperation goals

Mexico and the United States signed three accords to improve bilateral customs procedures and expedite the flow of agricultural produce across their border
U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen shakes hands with Mexico's Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray after delivering a joint message in Mexico City – Photo: Henry Romero/Reuters
27/03/2018
13:12
Newsroom & Agencies
Mexico City
REUTERS
-A +A

On Monday, Mexico and the United States signed three accords to improve bilateral customs procedures and expedite the flow of agricultural products across their border.

In a joint news conference with U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, Mexico’s Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray said the first agreement aimed to promote joint cooperation to stop illegal merchandise crossing the border.

On Twitter, Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs (SRE) wrote in Spanish: "Mexico’s Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray and U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen witness the signature of a memorandum of understanding between Mexico's Tax of Administration Service (SAT) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. We strengthen Mexico-U.S. cooperation to reinforce compliance with our laws on international trade and customs."

The two agreed to implement programs of joint inspections of cargo between the neighbors, whose bilateral trade is worth half a trillion dollars a year.

Then, the governments signed an accord that would promote the trade of agricultural goods, the minister added.

On Twitter, SRE wrote in Spanish: "Moreover, a letter of intent was signed between Mexico's National Service for Animal and Plant Health, Food Safety and Quality (SENASICA) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to facilitate agro-food trade between Mexico and the U.S."

Nielsen said the two countries were also working on about 20 further memorandums of understanding and letters of intent.

Border security needs to be ramped up to halt the illicit flow of arms, Mexico’s Interior Minister Alfonso Navarrete said in a subsequent joint news conference with Nielsen.

“There needs to be much more caution taken... to reduce gradually but conclusively the high levels of violence when arms enter Mexico illegally,” Navarrete added.

The neighboring nations also need to share the responsibility of attending to refugee and asylum cases, he concluded.

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